Love Grows.

love grows 7

It also is very hard to photograph.  Yes, that’s a portrait on the inside of the egg.

I don’t usually shoot this angle but when I shoot from the front, if the inside is lit, the exterior is overexposed, so I added an extra image.

Obviously, this was a commission- I mean, I didn’t just paint two random people.  Like all of them, it looks better in person (you don’t usually look at it from a distance of two inches.)  The painted surface is about 1.75″x 1.5″, so a bit smaller than the ones that are done on the exterior. It’s very small, but this particular egg was really wide, so it gave me a good surface to work with.   The original image I was working from is this one:

 

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Which I cropped, filtered and simplified  to here:

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Part of the reason for the difference is in the curve of the egg – it looks fine when you look at it all at once, but shooting it from a narrow angle causes distortion due to the concave curve on the inside of the egg. Overall though, Im pretty happy with it- it’s so tiny and on a curved surface, after all.

The exterior is a simple vine pattern in white over a lightly crazed black.  The exterior is a semigloss but I sealed the interior in a dead matte so as not to cause glare on the portrait.  Protip:  that pink paint bleeds terribly once the sealant hits it.  It took forever to retouch the portrait.    There’s some sculpts on the front that are primarily there to support the bridge pieces on the front. I made the little heart out of the material I had left over.

This is the last portrait I had on my plate.  Next up? Things that are absolutely not portraits.

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2 thoughts on “Love Grows.

  1. Hi there. Nice work. Have you considered applying curvilinear pincushion distortion to photos before using them as reference material for portraits on concave surfaces? I’m a professional ceramic artist so I don’t paint on real eggs but distorting photographic reference material is how we deal with this problem. It’s actually a more complex issue with ceramics because surface geometry is rarely flat or predictable.

    • I wish I had thought of that, but honestly it never occurred to me. This is the only time I have ever been asked to paint on a concave surface, but that’s a terrific idea and I will use it next time I’m asked. Thanks for the tip!

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